Short-beaked common dolphin (Delphinus delphis)

In 2014 a study was initiated off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, to examine the spatial use and diving behavior of a number of species of odontocetes, with particular emphasis on Cuvier’s beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus).

Managing marine species effectively requires spatially and temporally explicit knowledge of their density and distribution. Habitat-based density models, a type of species distribution model (SDM) that uses habitat covariates to estimate species density and distribution patterns, are increasingly used for marine management and conservation because they provide a tool for assessing potential impacts (e.g., from fishery bycatch, ship strikes, anthropogenic sound) over a variety of spatial and temporal scales.

In 2014 a study was initiated off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, to examine the spatial use and diving behavior of a number of species of odontocetes, with particular emphasis on Cuvier’s beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus).

From 4 to 17 June 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted seismic surveys in the coastal waters of the Pacific Ocean, between Los Angeles and San Diego, to investigate earthquake hazards. As a part of this project, Cascadia Research was contracted by the USGS to monitor marine mammals from the survey platform and provide mitigation on impacts on marine mammals by requesting shutdown of the sound sources when marine mammals were close to the operations.

From 9 to 22 August 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted seismic surveys in the Pacific Ocean just off Los Angeles to investigate earthquake hazards. Details on the purposes and specifications of the equipment used are described below.

From 6 to 17 June 1999 (4 to 5 June were transit days), the U.S. Geological Survey conducted seismic-reflection surveys in the coastal waters of the Pacific Ocean, between Los Angeles and San Diego, to investigate earthquake hazards.

From 14 to 28 June 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted seismic-reflection surveys in the Santa Barbara Channel area off of southern California. As a part of this project, Cascadia Research was contracted by the USGS to monitor marine mammals from the survey platform and provide mitigation on impacts on marine mammals by requesting shutdown of the sound sources when marine mammals were close to the operations.

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