Common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)

As part of a long-term U.S. Navy-funded marine mammal monitoring program, in February 2016 a combining boat-based field effort and passive acoustic monitoring was carried out on and around the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF). The U.S. Navy funded five days of small-boat effort and the National Marine Fisheries Service funded an additional two days of effort. There were 859 kilometers (49 hours) of small-vessel survey effort over the course of the seven‑day project.

There are 18 species of odontocetes found around the main Hawaiian Islands, and 11 of these have resident, island-associated populations in the eastern main Hawaiian Islands (Baird 2016). Until recently, relatively little was known about the presence and residency status of most of these species in the western main Hawaiian Islands, in particular around Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau. The U.S.

In 2014 a study was initiated off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, to examine the spatial use and diving behavior of a number of species of odontocetes, with particular emphasis on Cuvier’s beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus).

Sighting and stranding data are often used to identify patterns in marine mammal occurrence. Here we evaluate the use of public sighting reports, systematic surveys (where available), and stranding data from 1995-2015 to test how well these reflect trends in nine cetacean species in Puget Sound, Washington, USA. In general we found good agreement in documenting trends in occurrence between one of the sighting sources and strandings for 7 of 9 species, though there were often some species-specific considerations.

In 2014 a study was initiated off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, to examine the spatial use and diving behavior of a number of species of odontocetes, with particular emphasis on Cuvier’s beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus).

In the last few years, several unexpected species have been sighted and stranded in southern Puget Sound. This has included the return of one species, the harbor porpoise, that used to be common but had disappeared for many decades from Puget Sound before returning in recent years, and the occurrence of three species since 2010 that are either unknown or extremely rare this far north.

SOCAL‐10 was a scientific research project conducted in Aug‐Sept 2010 in the Southern California Bight. The overall objective was to provide a better understanding of marine mammal behavior, while providing direct scientific data for the Navy and regulatory agencies to estimate risk and minimize adverse effects of human sounds, particularly military sonar.

Pages