Persistent organic pollutants and stable isotopes in biopsy samples (2004/2006) from Southern Resident killer whales

Publications >> Persistent organic pollutants and stable isotopes in biopsy samples (2004/2006) from Southern Resident killer whales

Citation

Krahn, M.M., M.B. Hanson, R.W. Baird, R.H. Boyer, D.G. Burrows, C.K. Emmons, J.K.B. Ford, L.L. Jones, D.P. Noren, P.S. Ross, G.S. Schorr, and T.K. Collier. 2007. Persistent organic pollutants and stable isotopes in biopsy samples (2004/2006) from Southern Resident killer whales. Marine Pollution Bulletin 54:1903-1911.

Abstract

 

‘‘Southern Resident’’ killer whales include three ‘‘pods’’ (J, K and L) that reside primarily in Puget Sound/Georgia Basin during the spring, summer and fall. This population was listed as ‘‘endangered’’ in the US and Canada following a 20% decline between 1996 and 2001. The current study, using blubber/epidermis biopsy samples, contributes contemporary information about potential factors (i.e., levels of pollutants or changes in diet) that could adversely affect Southern Residents. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes indicated J- and L-pod consumed prey from similar trophic levels in 2004/2006 and also showed no evidence for a large shift in the trophic level of prey consumed by L-pod between 1996 and 2004/2006. ΣPCBs decreased for Southern Residents biopsied in 2004/2006 compared to 1993–1995. Surprisingly, however, a three-year-old male whale (J39) had the highest concentrations of ΣPBDEs, ΣHCHs and HCB. POP ratio differences between J- and L-pod suggested that they occupy different ranges in winter.

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